Abady Law Firm, P.C. – Customs and Import/Export Attorney Blog

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Posts Tagged "license"

U.S. Export Sanctions to Iran Lifted on Electronic Devices

On May 30, 2013, the U.S. government issued a General License on the export of electronic devices such as, cellphones, laptops, computers, and wireless routers to Iran.  This effectively ended a ban that has been in place since 1992.  According to the Department of Treasury’s press release “this General License aims to empower the Iranian people as their government intensifies its efforts to stifle their access to information.”  Pursuant to 31 C.F.R. Part 560 the General License does not authorize the export of any listed equipment to the Iranian government or to any individual or entity on the Specially Designated Nationals (SDN) list.

If you have any questions about the specifics of this regulation or would like to begin exporting authorized electronic devices or any other types of goods to Iran contact us at 347-512-9007 for legal assistance.

Import/Export Attorney: OFAC, Cuba, and Baseball

The Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) of the US Department of the Treasury administers and enforces economic and trade sanctions based on US foreign policy and national security goals against targeted foreign countries and regimes, terrorists, international narcotics traffickers, those engaged in activities related to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and other threats to the national security, foreign policy or economy of the United States. OFAC acts under Presidential national emergency powers, as well as authority granted by specific legislation, to impose controls on transactions and freeze assets under US jurisdiction. Many of the sanctions are based on United Nations and other international mandates, are multilateral in scope, and involve close cooperation with allied governments.

Baseball and Cuba are synonymous.  Cuba has been known to develop top talent in Major League Baseball.  Such names include Rafael Palmeiro, Jose Canseco, Minnie Miñoso, and Camilo Pascual. However, given the lack of diplomatic relations between the United States and Cuba it has been difficult for Cuban nationals to represent their homeland.  When a player decides to defect from Cuba, he has made his choice between the two countries.   Today, top Cuban Major League players include Yoenis Céspedes, Aroldis Chapman, and Leonys Martin.   In order to sign with a major league team these Cuban baseball players had to first present either an unblocking license from the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC) or two permanent residency documents from another country. See 31 C.F.R. 515.505 below:

(a) General license unblocking certain persons. The following persons are licensed as unblocked nationals, as that term is defined in § 515.307 of this part:

(1) Any individual who:

(i) Has taken up residence in the United States;
(ii) Is a United States citizen, a permanent resident alien of the United States, or has applied to become a permanent resident alien of the United States and has an adjustment of status application pending; and
(iii) Is not a specially designated national; and

(2) Any entity that otherwise would be a national of Cuba solely because of the interest therein of an individual licensed in paragraph (a)(1) of this section as an unblocked national.

(b) Specific licenses unblocking certain individuals who have taken up permanent residence outside of Cuba. Individual nationals of Cuba who have taken up permanent residence outside of Cuba may apply to the Office of Foreign Assets Control to be specifically licensed as unblocked nationals. Applications for specific licenses under this paragraph should include copies of at least two documents indicating permanent residence issued by the government authorities of the new country of permanent residence, such as a passport, voter registration card, permanent resident alien card, or national identity card. In cases where two of such documents are not available, other information will be considered, such as evidence that the individual has been resident for the past two years without interruption in a single country outside of Cuba or evidence that the individual does not intend to, or would not be welcome to, return to Cuba.

For more information regarding OFAC as it relates to baseball contact us at 347-512-9007.

Export Attorney: Commodity Jurisdiction Request

When a entity is presented with the question of whether a good or service falls under the Commerce Control List (“CCL”) or the United States Munitions List (“USML”) they may proceed for a commodity jurisdiction request (“CJ”).  The U.S. government applies different licensing procedures and policies depending on above jurisdiction.

The Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) is the licensing agency for exports subject to the Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”) containing the CCL. The Department of State Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (“DDTC”) is the licensing agency for exports subject to the the Arms Export Control Act (“AECA”) and the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (“ITAR”); the ITAR contains the USML.

Once a CJ is submitted the DDTC will make a determination as to its licensing authority.  This determination is not a license or approval to export an item or perform a service; one must still gain the appropriate approval from BIS or DDTC prior to export. The timetable for the processing of a CJ varies depending on the complexity of the request and the recommendations of the reviewing agencies. However, the DDTC estimates that requests should be answered within 60 days.

Proper export control determination is a fundamental and vital step in export compliance.  The consequences for an incorrect jurisdiction may result in large fines and a list of mandated remedial export compliance control measures.  Moreover, a wrong CJ puts the United States’ national security at risk. Thus, it is important to identify potential issues and if unsure as to the CJ, ASK QUESTIONS.  Steps should be taken to ensure that your company has written procedures in place to alleviate risk.  Moreover, a company should ensure that it has proper record keeping methods in place because one is required to retain records of exports for the previous five (5) years. Finally, experts should be consulted to confirm that the information your company possess is accurate and comprehensive. As the saying goes, ‘An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

You may contact us at 347-512-9007 for any questions or concerns regarding export compliance.