Abady Law Firm, P.C. – Customs and Import/Export Attorney Blog

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Archive for the "Copyright, Trademark, Patent" Category

Hoverboards On Fire This Holiday Season – Literally

 

Burned hoverboard. Photo: CPSC hoverboard fire

This past holiday season hoverboards have been one of the most popular items this past holiday season.  As a result, we have received numerous phone calls regarding U.S. Customs and Border Protection (“CBP” or “Customs”) intense examinations of these products.  The reason being is that there have been cases where these hoverboards burst into flames due to counterfeit batteries being used to power them. See here http://nypost.com/2015/12/30/hoverboard-bursts-into-flames-inside-a-brooklyn-apartment/. This led to intervention by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (“CPSC”), the federal agency regulating the safety of consumer products nationwide.

Customs and CPSC work closely to ensure the safety of products that are imported in the U.S. Customs is the “enforcer at the border” and enforces not only their own regulations but the regulations of all third party federal agencies.  Here, importers must ensure the quality of these hoverboards before importation. Make sure the factory you purchase from has a licensing agreement with the trademark holder of the battery inside.  If you are dealing with an agent in a foreign country make sure you get a paper trail leading to the trademark holder.  Once these goods arrive at the port of entry there is generally no turning back.  The trademark holder is unlikely to offer any assistance if the batteries are counterfeit and Customs will detain, seize, forfeit and destroy these goods.  Meaning the importer is out the money spent to their supplier for the purchase of the goods and Customs may come after the importer for penalties (if you receive a penalty contact a Customs and International Trade expert immediately).

How can this mistake be avoided?  Make sure you get a full understanding of what you are buying, the components (and packaging) comprising a product are just as important as the product as a whole. A minor mistake will cost you, and seizure will not be remitted because of ignorance.   Further, Customs will have you flagged as a potential violator and you may see an increase is examinations (and delays) at ports of entry.   Thus, if there are any trademarks on the goods, seek documentation supporting their legitimacy.  If you need help with identifying issues or verifying documentation contact an attorney experienced in Customs and International Trade law.

Resource Information

For more information about this blog post, please contact Abady Law Firm, P.C. and speak with our customs attorney at (800) 549-5099. Also visit www.customsesq.com to chat with a customs and international trade attorney —  about your company’s import/export situation and to schedule a consultation.  To chat with us, click the bottom right corner tab of our homepage.

Customs Attorney: Customs and Border Protection: Intellectual Property Enforcement

As a Customs attorney I find it surprising that intellectual property holders do not take advantage of Customs and Border Protection’s (“CBP”) ability to protect their intellectual property (“IP”). CBP is authorized to search all imports/exports and exclude, detain, and/or seize products that are counterfeit or otherwise infringing on the intellectual property of the IP holder. The way to gain the assistance of CBP is to utilize their Intellectual Property Rights Recordation System

CBP’s record system is separate and apart from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and Copyright office filing. In order to maximize the IP holder’s rights at the border they should record with CBP via the e-Recordation system. CBP has provided some benefits of e-Recording:

  • Making intellectual property rights information available at the ports to help CBP personnel with infringement determinations.
  • Eliminating paper applications and the need for supporting documents.
  • Allowing rights owners to upload images of their protected rights.

Additonally, IP holders can work with Customs in order to help them identify infringers. Businesses and rights owners are encouraged to submit allegations of infringing shipments or conduct to CBP. CBP then uses this information to locate such activity. Further, IP holders can provide CBP with e-guides for detecting infringing goods. Lastly, IP holders can initiate training sessions to actual CBP inspectors at troublesome ports of entry.

To find trademark and copyright records one can access http://iprs.cbp.gov/. I urge IP holders to take advantage of these enforcement opportunities to ensure quality control of their IP rights. One can contact a Customs attorney who can guide an IP holder in maximizing the enforcement of their IP rights with CBP.

You may call us at 347-512-9007 for more information on your international trade and customs issues.